Who moved my SLP cheese?


Have you ever read the book Who Moved My Cheese? by Dr. Spencer Johnson?

While the book’s reviews on Amazon.com are less than flattering, I found the book to be simple yet powerful. It is 94 pages of “realiz[ing] the need for finding the language and tools to deal with change–an issue that makes all of us nervous and uncomfortable.”

The book centers around these 4 mice characters – Sniff and Scurry, and Hem and Haw. As you might imagine Sniff and Scurry are ones who deal with change quite easily, while Hem and Haw wallow in their unexpected and unwanted change. Their adventures through a maze center around someone continually moving their ‘cheese'; how the mice handle it makes you really analyze your own behavior.

With perfect timing as I was reading the book, I received an e-mail which immediately made me frustrated with myself.  Someone had moved my SLP cheese. I had forgotten to sign an assessment report, which therefore meant I needed to drive 1.5 hours to take 5 seconds and sign the paper. Oh, I thought about not doing doing it, but that’s not an option; the cheese had been moved and there was only one way to solve it – accept the moving cheese.

When you think of the changing profession of Speech-Language Pathology there are few things more relevant than the acceptance of constantly moving cheese. Clients cancel. Schedules change.

The SLP cheese is ever moving. Whoever keeps moving it sure knows how to rock the maze of life though.

About these ads

About SLP_Echo

I am a Speech-Language Pathologist completing my Clinical Fellowship in Alaska.

Posted on August 22, 2012, in SLPeep and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Hy, I totally loved your blog. I’m a SLP from Mexico (Monterrey) my work is my biggest passion and I can see that on your blog..congrats..Here I am, eberything you need. Monica

  2. I’m a little late to this post but the title caught my eye!

    I remember reading that book several years ago – possibly when I was in grad school or just after I graduated! It was a good (and very quick) book. I find we’re more able to deal with change when we’re passionate about something – although occasionally that passion means we’re passionate about the way something ‘was always done before’.

  1. Pingback: ASHA 2012 Convention Theme « SLP_Echo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,991 other followers

%d bloggers like this: