Summer Reading List for New SLP Grad Students


I’ve posted statistics, tips, ideas, and resources for applying to Speech-Language Pathology graduate school. For those of you who read them and used the ideas, thank you! For those of you who did not, that’s OK, we can still be friends. I will get us one of those friendship necklaces. BFFs. I digress.

This post is intended for those who were accepted into an SLP graduate program and are anxiously and excitedly awaiting to start. Those were the days. When you wake up without a constant twinge of nervousness, contemplating if you will get in anywhere. TallyHo! Now you can breathe a little easier knowing you have a place to call home for the next 2-3 years. A place that will shape you, mold you, make you into a real-life Speech-Language Pathologist. Yippee!!

Now, you have a few months before you start. Don’t sit like a bump on a log for the next 2-3 months, but at the same time, take time to enjoy graduation, freedom, and summer time. Graduate school isn’t all unicorns, rainbows, and meadow frolicking. In preparation for the  deluge of information that will soon ensnare your mind, consider the following Summer Reading List as you lay on a beach or veg-out on the couch. As you consider and use the list below, keep in mind to review the big areas in SLP:

  • Articulation
  • Phonology
  • Dysphagia
  • Voice
  • Fluency
  • Language Development and Disorders
  • AAC

Free Summer Reading List

  1. Undergraduate Notes – The jumbled mess that is your undergraduate notes, look them over. Remember what was tough to remember. Recall the topics which you first skimmed, and look more closely this time around.
  2. Undergraduate Textbooks – Especially the ever-lovely Anatomy text for a review of the facial, swallowing, and laryngeal musculature necessary for speech and swallowing.
  3. SLP Scope of Practice - Now I’m sure at some point a professor pointed you in this documents direction, and you glanced over it with an eye of disillusionment. I said to myself, “How in the world will I ever know all of this?!” Now, break it out, look over the sections, and take note of things you don’t know or have never heard of. Google it. Research it. Don’t let your newness get the best of you.
  4. ASHA’s Compendium of EBP Guidelines and Systematic Reviews - Mind. Blown. I was introduced to this resource way too late in my SLP graduate school journey. Bookmark it. Tattoo it to your arm (obvious exaggeration). Look through the topics that interest you. Aphasia, dysphagia, dementia, feeding, and more. The guidelines documents are great for overview when working with the disorder – a starting place – and the evidence for the topics are equally helpful for preparing for future clients.
  5. ASHA’s Practice Portal – This is a new venture for ASHA, but promises to be my future go-to spot when a difficult client comes my way (still in Beta trials). Currently, there are only 4 topics available, but there is more coming in 2013…stay tuned!
  6. Previous years’ ASHA Convention Handouts - If you have a specific area of interest or can’t find information in a given area, search handouts and see what you can find. People work hard when presenting, so use the resource.

I am planning a Part 2 to this reading list which highlights paid options for those wanting more resources than are available online. For now, this will get you started.

Happy reading fellow SLP graduate students!!

SLP Grad school = Rainbows and stuff

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About SLP_Echo

I am a Speech-Language Pathologist completing my Clinical Fellowship in Alaska.

Posted on May 20, 2013, in #slp2b and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. I have two recommendations for your paid list (though the library can make these a free option).

    1. The Zen of Listening: Mindful Communication in the Age of Distraction by Rebecca Shafir CCC-SLP

    Helpful for being a student, SLP, and all around good human being.

    2. An Advanced Review of Speech-Language Pathology: Preparation for Praxis and Comprehensive Examination

    Most of the important concepts in a concise version with charts and such. I remember studying this at the end of my program thinking, this would have been really helpful to refer to throughout my program. Great reference. You don’t have to buy the newest version. Go to Ebay and get one less than 5 years old.

  2. Can you instantly fall in love with someone you’ve never met?

    In other words, thank you. This is an excellent list.

  3. I’m a clinical fellow now in the public high school and my first year was definitely challenging out in the field but I’m ready to hit the ground running in August…thanks for this list I will definitely be reviewing it!

  1. Pingback: Staying Connected to SLPs | karlabee, SLP (grad student)

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