Blog Archives

Millennials and Future SLPs


The 2009 ASHA Board of Directors and  Lemke and Dublinske prepared a document – Designing ASHA’s Future: Trends for the Association and the Professions - for the SLP profession. One of the future “trends” I was most interested in related to Generation Y, or the Millennial generation (born between 1982 and 2002).

In 2011, ASHA surveyed the professions’ impression of Generation Y with the question “What has your experience with members of generation Y led you to believe about their future involvement in Association volunteer roles compared to that of other generations?” (ASHA, 2011).  Most respondents, 68%, agreed it would be more challenging to engage this group of individuals; however, the article compared the results to a 2007 survey which showed:

“Respondents reported the generation  to believe more strongly in the importance of volunteering…[the challenge] will be in finding meaningful and substantive ways to involve these less experienced but eager young professionals” (p. 4).

**Waves** I’m an “eager young professional” ASHA – I am ready to be captivated **

So what was the consensus solution to address the issue?  ASHA’s strategic objectives to address future issues included:

  1. Develop and implement programs that engage members in ASHA activities,
  2. Increase targeted events for new members only in the profession three to five years.
  3. Public relations with members and STUDENTS
  4. Customize programs and products for the targeted audience

pln

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Streamlining SLP Grad School Applications


This isn’t a post with answers. This is a post with questions. Questions to add to the already mounting questions other SLP Graduate school hopefuls have after filling out an avalanche of applications.

People applying to SLP Graduate Programs across the country have to do the following, in general:

  1. Locate an accredited university with a Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology
  2. Find the Communication Sciences and Disorders (or SLP) tab/link/website/hidden portal to the underworld
  3. See the requirements for applications – 3+ letters of recommendation, resume, letter of intent, essay, application form, all your money (approx $3.8 million per school…approximately).
  4. Find the application portal. (All these portals, you would think we are getting somewhere. But no, you stay in one place waiting for their call)
  5. Submit application requirements.
  6. Wait for what seems like eternity. Usually 1-4 months.
  7. Receive rejection or acceptance email/letter/pigeon – Rejoice! or Weep in a pool of tears.

CONFUSED echo

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A follow up to “Craft a Stand-Out Application”


In the January 2014 publication of the ASHA Leader, there was  a post entitled “Student’s Say: Craft a Stand-Out Application” As far as my Google search of “ASHA + SLP grad school applications” took me, this is one of the first of it’s kind for ASHA. I’ve been blogging about these same issues for over 2 years. Giving similar hints, tips, and advice the author, Carol Polovoy, offered up.

What I particularly appreciate about this post is that she was able to interview and get recent statistics from SLP grad schools. For instance,   she reported “Montclair (N.J.) State University, for example, received 541 speech-language pathology program applications and accepted 38 (7 percent) for the 2011–2012 year.” 7%!!!!??? Woah. That’s depressing. But then she followed with another recent statistic, saying  “The University of Pittsburgh…received 339 applications for 2011– 2012, and offered admission to 94 (27.7 percent).” 27.7% is WAY better than 7%.

I’ve never claimed to be an expert, but in 2012 I wrote a post on the chances of getting admitted into an SLP graduate school. I collected my numbers from the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CAPCSD). I’ve also written several other posts – here and here and here and here  – about the application process. It’s now 2014. The process has only gotten tougher and more competitive. People are interested in the field of Speech-Language Pathology. Applicants are frustrated, tired, and worn down by the process of applying and the potential rejection.

ASHA, I appreciate the post and the thoroughness the author went through to get the information. Now…what’s next? Are there any more posts planned on this topic? Because there are so many questions from students. They need answers, and not from me. My blog is only popular because these issues aren’t being addressed elsewhere. I hope ASHA has more posts like this.. real, heart felt, and research based.

I can’t be the only one blabbering on about the SLP grad school trenches. Let’s see what happens.

The #SLPeeps at ASHA 2012 – Atlanta or Bust


So what’s been happenin’ in yalls neck o’ the woods? (as we say in the South) I’ve been busy with my new part-time medical internship at the hospital where I live. Loving the hospital setting, doing modified barium swallow studies (MBSSs), and seeing clients for both in-patient and out-patient rehabilitation and assessment. But, I digress…

Before the internet or even in the early 2000s, you had to read the ASHA leader, attend conventions, or call/write/telegram an SLP or AUD friend to find out the latest news. When Twitter launched in 2006, I distinctly remember saying, ” I will never use Twitter; that is for hipsters.”

Well here I am in 2012, using Twitter, and using it daily. Don’t judge me; if anything, you should join the ranks. I mentioned in a previous post  the common practice is to Google therapy ideas to supplement Evidence Based Practice. Well in order for Google to answer these requests, there must be someone to post the answer first. Other, more experienced SLPs have begun answering questions and posting ideas for others to find, such as: @SLPTanya @Azspeechguy , @speechtechie , @apujo5@Speechreka , @ActivityTailor , @mtmarySLP , and many, many more.

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2012 ASHA Convention: Blogger_Echo


I was quite excited to learn I was chosen to be 1 of 3 official 2012 ASHA Convention Bloggers. The details of the selection process are a mystery to me but I like to imagine I was chosen because they heard of my newbie (semi-awesome) blog, my excitement to join the profession, and my ever-so-amateur photos I post on here as well. Or perhaps it is because there is a lack of blogs written by SLPs or student SLPs in the great state of Georgia, which just so happens to be hosting the convention. I tend to think it’s more the latter, but no matter the reason, here is where I string together letters and words to form what is my blog.

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The Wizard of Oz and SLPs


Have you ever thought ASHA was similar to the great Wizard of Oz? I gathered my thoughts, and I have found I enjoy a great many quotes quite relevant to my life:

“Back where I come from, we have universities, seats of great learning, where men go to become great thinkers. And when they come out, they think deep thoughts and with no more brains than you have. But they have one thing you haven’t got: a diploma.”

“Back where I come from there are men who do nothing all day but good deeds. They are called phila… er, phila… er, yes, er, Good Deed Doers.” 

“Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!”

- Wizard of Oz

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SLP Related Awareness Months


As a part of NSSLHA and our Advocacy aspect as Speech-Language Pathologists, we are encouraged and happy to spread information about our profession. Personally, I want more people to know how an SLP can help in more than just one or two aspects of the field. While every profession – nursing, PT, OT, respiratory, teachers – has its place among the disciplines, I am focused on how SLPs can impact more and more people.

A great way to spread the word about our profession and skill-set is to piggy-back off of Nationally recognized “Awareness Months” with an SLP twist. So,if you are looking for a way to stretch our services or reach new clients, may I suggest one of the following:

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Social EBP for SLP


When I decided to start blogging about SLP related things, I never stopped to think, “Will anyone actually read my blog?” It was more about putting my answers out into the cyber world because I couldn’t “Google-it-out” (instead of ‘figure-it-out ). When I have an SLP related question about a new therapy idea, rationale for a therapy approach, or just want to see what other #slpeeps are doing, doesn’t everyone just Google it?

Maybe I’m not speaking to the entire crowd of Google enthusiast, but I am sure a few of you might relate. Now, I know the ‘book’ says Evidence Based Practice is the way to go, and I agree to a certain extent. However, when you run out of ideas, plateau in your data, get bored of your own warm-ups/drills/games…where else can you turn besides journals?

  • Google
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • SLP friends
  • Creative teachers and tweak their classroom activities/ideas
  • SLP blogs

I think these should have their own EBP  – “The EBP Social Heptagon”

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Evidence Based Practice – SLP


Every semester we are assigned clients in the on-campus Speech and Hearing Clinic . *nerves* The frightening sensation that someone is paying to have me work with their child, teen, or with them as an adult is surreal. Just a year ago I was sitting in class thinking about what I was going to do for Spring Break or over Summer vacation. Now, my thoughts are about the types of therapy techniques for clients with Dysphagia or if I know what to do for a child with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)….For the record, I do know these things :)

Anywho… Evidence Based Practice: What drives Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Our Supervisors give us the task to find 3 articles to support the type of therapy intervention we choose for our clients.

Here is a general profile of what I used in serach of Evidence to base my Practice on:

  • Autism
  • Child
  • Non-verbal
  • speech

I decided to use a Play-based therapy approach termed Milieu, where the child directs therapy, given a set of activities I pre-determine.

I found the following 3 articles to support using a Mileu Therapy. They are followed by my accompanying reviews:

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ASHA Convention 2012 – Atlanta, GA


ASHA Convention 2012 Atlanta, GA

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association 2012 National Convention will be in Atlanta Georgia at the Georgia World Congress Center November 15 – 17, 2012. Home.

I have never been to an ASHA Convention so this year will be my first. I’ve also submitted a Call for Papers. I’ve never been so nervous before clicking a Submit button. I want to share what my research is about and I have many hopes and prayers it will be accepted. If not, I’m getting great clinical experience on how to apply, how to research, and learning along the way.

TITLE: Executive Functioning Training in College-Age Students

 ABSTRACT:

Research shows individuals with ADD, ADHD, and LD have deficits in executive functioning. Collaboration with Disability Service Providers and the SLP Department allowed for greater student access. The presentation discusses a 6-week intervention program given through a University clinic targeting attention, memory, sequencing, problem solving, and executive functioning.

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