Blog Archives

A resource for those starting SLP Graduate School


Just a few years ago, I was sitting in my un-classy apartment in West Georgia impatiently waiting to start SLP grad school. It’s been almost 3 years and I’ve learned one or 2 things. Last year, I wrote “Summer Reading List for New SLP Grad Students” . But, allow me to share something I wish someone had shared with me long ago…

SpeechPathology.com - ever heard of it? Maybe you have. I see their ads in my Facebook feed. Or in emails I didn’t realize I signed up for at an ASHA convention. But this one…this one is worth clicking on.

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SLP Graduate School Midterm


In undergrad, studying for a midterm in a course like Biology, math, history, etc. was more about the short-term. How little can I study in order to make an A or B? or What do I need to make in order to make my desired grade? I’m sure others may disagree with this mentality, but that’s how I got things done. Now,  in SLP graduate school, I need to know this information for the long-term. I realize I will have these textbooks/resources down the road, but when I am assessing or treating a client, there are just certain things I need to know immediately. Thus, I study differently.

I have a midterm in Neuropathologies of Language on Tuesday covering the following topics from our Brookshire (2007), An Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders, textbook:

  1. Neuroanatomy
  2. Neurologic Assessment
  3. Assessment of Cognition
  4. Assessment of Language
  5. Context for Intervention
  6. Aphasia
  7. Right Hemisphere Syndrome

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SLP Hipster Salad


Are you aware that you have a mammillary body, infundibular stalk, peduncles, and an inferior olive in your brain? Well, you do; but it sounds more like hipster salad ingredients to me. If this comes up on my Neuropathologies quiz tomorrow, I plan to put “hipster salad” on the label; I will get extra points for my quip, I imagine.

 

“Tough times never last, but tough people do.” ~ Robert H. Schuller

 

What are my chances of getting into grad school for SLP?


On Feb 8, 2014, I published a Part 2 to follow-up with this data – Check it out!

When you decide to pursue an undergraduate degree in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) or Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), you must consider that you cannot work independently with just a Bachelor’s. You must pursue a masters or doctorate in order to be considered a fully independent Speech-Language Pathologist (CCC-SLP).

Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders

So, what are the chances you will get into a graduate school for speech-language pathology? Here are some statistics:

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Core Skills for an #slp2b


A WONDERFUL and helpful book for the growing SLP is entitled “Here’s How to Do Therapy: Hands-On Core Skills in Speech-Language Pathology”  Not only is her book encouraging and practical, the accompanying CD is wonderful.

While topics below are covered in many textbooks and SLP grad courses, this is my attempt to share those gems of knowledge and further explanation, which have stuck with me along the way:

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What is a Speech-Language Pathologist?


A few years ago,  I made this flyer for CSD Awareness Month - What is a Speech Language Pathologist?. Yet, I think I still missed the mark. Let me break it down – Speech…Language…Pathologist…

  • Speech – the coordination of the brain and necessary muscles used to produce speech
  • Language - a system of codes, symbols, and sounds that convey meaning and is rule-governed
  • Pathologist – a person who deals with the theory and causation of disorders

A Speech-Language Pathologist is qualified to evaluate and diagnose speech, language, cognitive-communication and swallowing disorders. We treat individuals of all ages, from infants to the elderly…and people wonder why a Master’s degree, Clinical Fellowship, and a series of tests are required.

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SLP Humor Part 2


With all the social networks – Twitter, Facebook, Pintrest, Tumblr – which invade us with pictures, quotes, and opinions, I want to share a few of the things I’ve come across over the past few years which have made me smile, laugh, and/or agree with. I wish I had done a better job of tagging where I got the images from; just know the only image in this post that is my own is the one above (purple socks).

<<This book was in a shop in Chattanooga, TN. Perhaps this would be a good book to discuss grief with…this dino just looks so heartbroken.

In therapy you could discuss why he is all by himself, why his neck is awkwardly long, or what death means for his own species.

What a book :)

Ahh, exams. I found this picture in the>>> midst of final exams in Fall 2011.

The perfect comic comes along at the perfect time. I wish I could recall all the things I recalled from the days of studying for hours.

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SLP Graduate Program


 

So after a few messages from some of my  Twitter followers (@SLPeepEcho) and some people who have come across my blog , I’m realizing it is difficult to find information about what a school’s Graduate program is like.

I have some insight into the University of West Georgia’s Speech-Language Pathology Master’s of Education Program. Just to be clear, I have no personal or financial investment in the program; just a desire to share my experiences from going here for both my Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees in SLP:

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Phonetics and CSD Programs


In 2001, Michael Moran and James Fitch published an article titled Phonological Awareness Skills of University Students: Implications for Teaching Phonetics. I first read the article in Summer 2010 and have thought of it often. When I was a Senior in the UWG Speech-Language Pathology Undergrad program, I offered Phonetic tutoring sessions for the rising juniors. I took a liking to the different ‘language’ phonetics offers, and thought I could lend some help.

What is most striking about the article is the “Phonological Awareness Tasks” which the authors tried on 21 CSD students taking a phonetics course.

The tasks look at:

  • Phoneme Switching (“had bear” = “bad hair”
  • Phonetic Reversal (“sick” = “kiss)
  • Phoneme Counting (soul = 3 phonemes)
  • Vowel Matching (“shoe” matches “two”)
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