Blog Archives

Being the Youngest Expert in the Room


One thing about entering and graduating from a Master’s program at a relatively young age means that in a room full of experts, I tend to be the youngest one. It’s not a bad thing most of the time, and I’m probably the only one who quickly sizes up and estimates colleagues and parents’ age.  Sometimes, when I’m about to share my evaluation report or discuss a recent diagnosis, I get nervous. And I start running down my list of personally-perceived short comings; my gut reaction is to think of my age.

I’m 25 and in a position that allows me the responsibility to diagnose and plan courses of treatment for individuals who have difficulties with communication. 5 years ago my biggest responsibility was waking up in time for my dreaded 8:00 AM Philosophy class.  This CF year has been a huge transition in my life, both professionally and personally. I needed to mentally catch up with my new degree, new responsibilities, and new career.  I’m still working on it…obviously.

Walking into a meeting where I am the expert on the child, the expert on his or her language, I am supposed to gauge how the next year will look on our plan of action. I need to remember my skills and my strengths when those moments arise and I think my age makes me appear weak or uninformed. I’m young, but I have education and research on my side.  The experience will come in due time.

Until then, I am thankful for colleagues who share kind words about how well I do in meetings or how organized and on-top of things I seem. Only myself and you, my readers know the quiet inadequacies I need to overcome. Carry on.

YOUNGEST expert

SLP Clinical Fellowship – Qualities of a Mentor


You guys….today marks two quarters of my first year as a Speech-Language Pathologist. That’s pretty much half way.  10 blog posts ago I was complaining about tests and exams. Now, I’m complaining about too many progress notes and not enough hours in the day.  Nothing quite like it – and I love it.

I was talking to my Clinical Fellowship mentor/supervisor yesterday about when she was doing my next observation, and she apologized that she might not make it over before Christmas break. I was so flustered about finishing evaluations and progress notes, that I honestly forgot she was supposed to come. This wonderful woman has made herself available to me at any time. She’s set things aside to come and observe me.  I am just thankful to have her time via phone/email, much less her making time to come see me.

I write all that to say, finding a Clinical Fellowship mentor, ideally, should be like a fond Christmas memory. You can always call on that memory to feel better, to calm down, to reminisce that life isn’t always this crazy. Christmas for me was about being with family who made you feel comfortable and reminded me that people are looking out for you. That’s what my mentor has been for me, whether she knows it or not.  Often times, a CF mentor is selected for you or maybe have more than one. I would like to share my thoughts on the qualities a great CF mentor should have:  Read the rest of this entry

Articulate It – A Review


Articulate It 

by Smarty Ears

Purpose

An app for speech sound disorders to be utilized by Speech-Language pathologists. The app allows for targeting articulation or phonological processes at the word, phrase, and sentence level while collecting data. The app was recently updated to version 3.2.1 in April 2013, so there are new features to the app to check out.

Price: $38.99 

For comparison, there are similar professional apps targeting similar areas, such as ArtikPix $30Articulation Station $50, Weber Photo Artic Castle $30, Pocket Artic $10

Articulate It Home screen shot

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Apraxia Ville – A Review


Apraxia Ville

by Smarty Ears, LLC

Purpose:

Apraxia Ville is designed for use by Speech-Language Pathologists working with children diagnosed with Apraxia of Speech. The app targets consonants and vowels in isolation, at the word level (CV & CVC), and in word sets (CV + CV or CVC + CVC).

Price: $21.99 (just released March 20, 2013)

opening screen of Apraxia Ville by Smarty Ears

Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

ASHA’s Position on the diagnosis of Childhood Apraxia of Speech says it “exists as a distinct diagnostic type of childhood speech sound disorders that warrants research and clinical services.” Furthermore, ASHA highlights three distinctive features SLPs should look for in addition to a comprehensive speech and language evaluation: (1) inconsistent errors on consonants and vowels in repeated productions of syllables/words, (2) irregular co-articulatory transitions between productions, and (3) excess, equal, and/or reduced prosody (intonation). These three features are not always present in every case of CAS occurrence, but help distinguish CAS from other speech sound disorders. Apraxia Ville targets the three main features ASHA mentions exceptionally well. Allow me to explain…

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Sunny Articulation and PhonologyTest (SAPT) – A Review


Sunny Articulation and Phonology Test (SAPT)

By Barbara Fernandes at Smarty Ears

SAPT screen shot - iPad

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Niki Time – A Review


Niki Time

By: Alessandro La Rocca

Purpose:

The app developer designed the app for use with children working on time concepts such as minutes, hour, half hour, days, months, weather, and seasons. Easy manipulation of the clock allows for instruction as well as interaction between a client and an SLP.

Price: $3.99

photo_1

 

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My PlayHome – A Review


My PlayHome 

by Shimon Young

Purpose: 

“My PlayHome is a doll house for the iGeneration…where your child can use everything, even the closets, TV and shower…fry an egg and feed the family pizza. Where you can pour drinks, blow bubbles and turn out the lights.” (via the iTunes description).

Price: Full version, $3.99 (Lite version $Free)

home screen - my playhome

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Categories Learning Center: A Review



Categories Learning Center

by Smarty Ears

Purpose:

An app designed by SLPs to improve language comprehension for all age groups. More specifically, it was developed to target categorization skills to improve word finding, memory, and reading comprehension difficulties.

Price = $9.99

categories learning center start up page

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Don’t freak out, it’s just the SH sound


There was a moment Monday, before I started my first day of my full-time school internship, where I panicked. Heart fluttering, mind-numbing, terrifying panic. I couldn’t verbalize how to teach the “SH” sound. I couldn’t think of its place or manner of articulation. It was like the knowledge was lost in an ambiguous depth of space and time. *POOF* 4 years of undergrad and a 1.5 years of a Master’s in Speech-Language Pathology, gone. Just. Like. That.

Now that my melodrama is over, it was truly only a momentary freak-out. Followed by a frenzy of technology, clicking, typing, and a slight hand-cramp from the manic episode. It happens to the best of us (that’s what I’m telling myself). So, what did I find you might ask? Allow me to share:

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Essential Social Media Tools for SLPs: Growth Starts Here


PediaStaff recently sponsored both a Learning Lab session and the Social Medial Learning Center booth (Featuring the #SLPeeps!) At both venues, we talked about why it is imperative that SLPs understand and embrace the world of social media that is taking our profession by storm. Whether you want to interact daily or prefer to sit back and listen, social media has become an invaluable resource for communicating with colleagues and staying on top of recent research and trends.

The booth and panel were both quite popular and visitors expressed an interest in learning more that they could take home with them to digest at their leisure. We anticipated that this would be the case, so together with other SLP bloggers and Tweeters, PediaStaff, co-authored and produced a simple e-book that will help us all. We will post the entire PDF next week, but in the meantime, please hop away and support all the fantastic contributors to this fantastic resource!

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“Do you search the internet or do you search people?” – @gregkulowiec

Social networks like Twitter, Pinterest, and blogs make it easier to find information written by professionals while encouraging a love to learn. Although research articles have their necessary place in our profession, the distant, formalized writing style often leaves readers with information, but no connection. Building a Professional Learning Network (PLN) provides unlimited opportunities to connect and network globally with professionals sharing similar interests. Simply check in to see the latest conversations and trends of the profession.

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