Effective Intervention for Expressive Grammar


It’s Research Tuesday! This week is all about grammar. I am up to my knees in grammar goals. Pluralization. Past tense. Present progressive. Pronouns. Possessives. It’s raining grammar in Alaska, folks…and I needed some guidance. Where better to get guidance than research. I didn’t get all that schoolin’ for nothin’ (excuse my grammar, ha!)

Article: Smith-Lock, K.M., Leitao, S., Lambert, L., & NIckels, L. (2013) Effective intervention for expressive grammar in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 48(3), 265-282. [Open Access|

grammar treatment

Useful content and strategies I can apply tomorrow:

  • Narratives without appropriate grammar decrease timing and reference points to link characters to the story line. (I can use this statement in explanation of IEP present levels/evaluation write-ups)
  • Utilize a specific grammar screener to determine potential treatment targets such as possessive “s”, past tense, present tense, and pronouns. Within the article, they pilot tested the screener on a group of typically developing same-age children for comparison.
  • Focused stimulation, recasting, and imitation are all efficacious treatment techniques for grammar interventions

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Millennials and Future SLPs


The 2009 ASHA Board of Directors and  Lemke and Dublinske prepared a document – Designing ASHA’s Future: Trends for the Association and the Professions – for the SLP profession. One of the future “trends” I was most interested in related to Generation Y, or the Millennial generation (born between 1982 and 2002).

In 2011, ASHA surveyed the professions’ impression of Generation Y with the question “What has your experience with members of generation Y led you to believe about their future involvement in Association volunteer roles compared to that of other generations?” (ASHA, 2011).  Most respondents, 68%, agreed it would be more challenging to engage this group of individuals; however, the article compared the results to a 2007 survey which showed:

“Respondents reported the generation  to believe more strongly in the importance of volunteering…[the challenge] will be in finding meaningful and substantive ways to involve these less experienced but eager young professionals” (p. 4).

**Waves** I’m an “eager young professional” ASHA – I am ready to be captivated **

So what was the consensus solution to address the issue?  ASHA’s strategic objectives to address future issues included:

  1. Develop and implement programs that engage members in ASHA activities,
  2. Increase targeted events for new members only in the profession three to five years.
  3. Public relations with members and STUDENTS
  4. Customize programs and products for the targeted audience

pln

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Reading Comprehension Research


As a new SLP in the schools, one thing I feel inadequately prepared for is the reading comprehension difficulties I see in children with language disorders, as well as Autism spectrum disorders (ASD). I found this article which looked at 3 case studies for children with ASD.  The study discussed the application of reading comprehension techniques.

I love research, even (especially) case-studies, that gives clinical methods I can turn around and use tomorrow. This is that kind of article that makes me happy. The author brings up excellent strategies that could be further investigated with my own clients. She chose the strategies based off other studies done in the past that show deficits in children with ASD then suggest one or two strategies. She has combined the research for literacy strategies and offers explanations on how to implement using the anonymous case-study individuals.

research tuesday

The strategies for increasing reading comprehension and higher order thinking skills were priming background knowledge, picture walks, visual maps, think-alouds and reciprocal thinking, understanding narrative text structure, goal structure mapping, emotional thermometers, and social stories. Continue reading “Reading Comprehension Research”

Blogging About Research – Phonemic Awareness in SLP Graduate Students


One of the perks of still being in graduate school means I have access to any and all journal articles since the dawn of time. Rachel at “Talks Just Fine” suggested a new blog installment where other #slpbloggers link up, and review current research within their scope of practice. I am all about this new venture! So, here is my first review of current research.

A Summary

Spencer, Schuele, Guillot, and Lee (2011) discussed the role of phonemic awareness in early literacy instruction, and how Speech-Language Pathologists have demonstrated increased ability for such skills. For instance, Spencer et al. (2008) evaluated teachers’ ability to perform phoneme segmentation; while teacher’s were accurate 55% of the time, SLPs were  75% accurate. So, why did the SLPs outperform classroom teachers?

In the current article (Spencer et al., 2011), the authors recruited 196 SLP undergraduate and graduate students at four Universities in the U.S.; Spencer et al. (2008) participants were the comparison group. Paper based phonemic awareness tests were administered to  students which evaluated (1) phoneme segmentation, (2) phoneme identification, and (3) phoneme isolation. The article also evaluated the type of coursework students had taken and how they contribute to phonemic awareness skill.

Overall, Spencer and colleagues (2011) found a phonetics course contributes the most to phonemic awareness skills, and may account for the discrepancies Spencer et al. (2008) found when SLPs were compared to educators.

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Naming TherAppy – A Review


Naming TherAppy

by Tactus Therapy

Purpose: 

“A word-finding app to help people with aphasia and children with special needs practice important naming and description skills.” I also find it useful for working with children and adults on expressive and receptive vocabulary, describing words, categorization, and other goals.

Price: $24.99, or try the Free, lite version of Language TherAppy which contains Naming TherAppy

Naming Therappy home page

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My PlayHome – A Review


My PlayHome 

by Shimon Young

Purpose: 

“My PlayHome is a doll house for the iGeneration…where your child can use everything, even the closets, TV and shower…fry an egg and feed the family pizza. Where you can pour drinks, blow bubbles and turn out the lights.” (via the iTunes description).

Price: Full version, $3.99 (Lite version $Free)

home screen - my playhome

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Categories Learning Center: A Review



Categories Learning Center

by Smarty Ears

Purpose:

An app designed by SLPs to improve language comprehension for all age groups. More specifically, it was developed to target categorization skills to improve word finding, memory, and reading comprehension difficulties.

Price = $9.99

categories learning center start up page

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