A resource for those starting SLP Graduate School


Just a few years ago, I was sitting in my un-classy apartment in West Georgia impatiently waiting to start SLP grad school. It’s been almost 3 years and I’ve learned one or 2 things. Last year, I wrote “Summer Reading List for New SLP Grad Students” . But, allow me to share something I wish someone had shared with me long ago…

SpeechPathology.com – ever heard of it? Maybe you have. I see their ads in my Facebook feed. Or in emails I didn’t realize I signed up for at an ASHA convention. But this one…this one is worth clicking on.

Continue reading “A resource for those starting SLP Graduate School”

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“Less Competitive” SLP Graduate Schools discussion


I’ve recently become fascinated by the SLP sub category on Reddit.com. It’s an open forum for questions, links, and information; in this sub-Reddit (as they say), there has been quite the discussion on “less competitive” SLP graduate schools.  When I was applying, I didn’t think any grad school was less competitive than another. I thought they all had equally competitive application processes. And to be honest, I associate “less competitive” with “easy” “accepts lower GPA/GRE” or “less applicants”. And in some ways, I guess that’s true.

There are two threads of discussion on this topic that I’ve focused on.

  1. Reddit: On 4/9/2014, the question “What are some “less competitive” SLP grad programs” was posed to the group. Currently at 18 comments at the time of this post, it’s a great discussion.
  2. TheGradCafe.com: On 1/23/2014 a user started the “Fall 2014 “Less Competitive” Grad Programs Applicants Thread!”. Currently at 250 replies, it’s an amazing read if you want to scour the pages.

I think what interests me the most is the sheer number of people searching this type of information. I get lots of hits on my blog with similar search terms. People want to get into this profession, yet are blocked at the door. I’m scared for my readers and happy for the ones that make it. But there are so many applicants that are worthy and passionate. I just wish there was more room for everyone.

Give these threads a read if you are interested. My thoughts on “less competitive” grad schools is that truly, there aren’t any. Searchers looking for an answer, there are suggestions in these posts that “safety” school exist. I just don’t know if that’s solid advice. Maybe I’m just uninformed or cynical in the matter. But nothing short of hard work, experience, and determination will get you into grad school. And even that isn’t always rewarded with a ticket.

Keep at it readers. Keep asking and keep discussing. If others have success, learn from it and use it as fuel for your own fire.

 

Effective Intervention for Expressive Grammar


It’s Research Tuesday! This week is all about grammar. I am up to my knees in grammar goals. Pluralization. Past tense. Present progressive. Pronouns. Possessives. It’s raining grammar in Alaska, folks…and I needed some guidance. Where better to get guidance than research. I didn’t get all that schoolin’ for nothin’ (excuse my grammar, ha!)

Article: Smith-Lock, K.M., Leitao, S., Lambert, L., & NIckels, L. (2013) Effective intervention for expressive grammar in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 48(3), 265-282. [Open Access|

grammar treatment

Useful content and strategies I can apply tomorrow:

  • Narratives without appropriate grammar decrease timing and reference points to link characters to the story line. (I can use this statement in explanation of IEP present levels/evaluation write-ups)
  • Utilize a specific grammar screener to determine potential treatment targets such as possessive “s”, past tense, present tense, and pronouns. Within the article, they pilot tested the screener on a group of typically developing same-age children for comparison.
  • Focused stimulation, recasting, and imitation are all efficacious treatment techniques for grammar interventions

Continue reading “Effective Intervention for Expressive Grammar”

Acceptance and Rejection


Were you accepted to an SLP graduate school? Or Did you receive one of those disheartening rejection letters?

Acceptance letters. I remember opening the email that held the golden ticket. I jumped up, screamed, and danced around my apartment. I tried calling my parents…no answer. I just sat there and cried. I had already been rejected from 3 other schools. I was feeling as if my life choice was the wrong one. And then I read that letter. The letter of acceptance. The joy and emotions cannot be expressed. I hope some of you…my lovely readers…have felt this same sensation as of late.

acceptance

Rejection letters. If you applied to multiple schools and have already received rejection letters, I wish I could hug you. Just thinking about that letter of rejection just makes me relive those moments of sadness, overwhelming helplessness, and feelings of inadequacy. All the hard work, accolades, and confidence just melt away in an instant.

Whether you are dancing for joy or reading this amid tears of rejection, remember those letters are just the beginning. The beginning of a 2 year graduate school journey. Or the beginning of waiting another year or shifting your goals. I don’t want to get cliché  here, rambling on about opening windows or when a door closes another opens. Blah blah…rejection letters just make you want to slam every door and break a window. But really, these letters don’t define your worth. You are worthy of your aspirations in this field.

Press on or move on – it’s up to you. But don’t let an acceptance letter boost your ego too much, and don’t let a rejection letter deflate all your dreams.

If you are waiting to hear back from various SLP graduate schools, then my thoughts are with you. Keep me posted and keep your spirits high!

What are my chances of getting into SLP grad school? Part 2


In 2012, I wrote “What are my chances of getting into grad school for SLP?”. It’s my most read post I’ve ever published. I know exactly why, too. People want to know if investing in a career as a Speech-Language Pathologist is easy or difficult and worth the investment.

In 2013, a joint publication by the Council of Academic Programs in Communications Sciences and Disorders (CAPCSD) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) published survey data based on information provided by nation-wide SLP graduate programs. It’s the same survey I used to find the data in my first post. In this post, I wanted to compare the 2 documents and see what’s changed over the past few years. One thing to keep in mind as you read through these, many individuals apply to more than one university – the large number of applications does not reflect the actual number of people who applied, just the number of applications. Check out the resource and info below for yourself…

Table 1 shows GRE scores that haven’t been converted to reflect the new score reporting using the ETS Concordance Table. No data was available from the 2011-2012 report.

average verbal - quantitative scores for SLP grad school
Table 1

Continue reading “What are my chances of getting into SLP grad school? Part 2”

A Must-Buy book for New SLPs


There hasn’t been a week during this first year as an SLP that I haven’t turned to pages in this book with an unmistakable urge to hunt down the authors and hug them forever.

Secord, W. A., Boyce, S. E., Donahue, J. S., Fox, R. A., & Shine, R. E. (2007). Eliciting sounds: Techniques and strategies for clinicians [spiral bound]. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson Delmar Learning. 

It runs about $50-$70. When I first bought this book, it didn’t feel important. It was almost like a leaflet you might pick up at a doctor’s office. Like an adult “Highlights Magazine”, except more expensive. Now days, it holds an esteemed place of honor in my top right hand drawer. Easily accessible. Always nearby. I would pay $100 for this gem.

I’m hoping this book is a standard required reading source in SLP grad school. If not, then buy it. You won’t regret it.

That is all for now. I’m cold…in Alaska…breaking news, huh? 🙂

In related news:

Interview with Wayne Secord on his book

Wayne Secord presentation on elicitation techniques

Eliciting /k/ and /g/ with help from Secord’s book

SLP Clinical Fellowship – Honestly


4 years of an undergraduate degree followed by 2 years getting a Master’s degree, all you really think about is that first payday when you start your Clinical Fellowship. Something about being paid for the work you are doing – it rights the soul. All those sleepless nights studying, worrying, writing, reading – ugh! If I had been paid for the work I invested in my education, let’s just say you could all come stay with me on my own Alaskan homestead.

Now, some honesty…

knight echo

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