Acceptance and Rejection


Were you accepted to an SLP graduate school? Or Did you receive one of those disheartening rejection letters?

Acceptance letters. I remember opening the email that held the golden ticket. I jumped up, screamed, and danced around my apartment. I tried calling my parents…no answer. I just sat there and cried. I had already been rejected from 3 other schools. I was feeling as if my life choice was the wrong one. And then I read that letter. The letter of acceptance. The joy and emotions cannot be expressed. I hope some of you…my lovely readers…have felt this same sensation as of late.

acceptance

Rejection letters. If you applied to multiple schools and have already received rejection letters, I wish I could hug you. Just thinking about that letter of rejection just makes me relive those moments of sadness, overwhelming helplessness, and feelings of inadequacy. All the hard work, accolades, and confidence just melt away in an instant.

Whether you are dancing for joy or reading this amid tears of rejection, remember those letters are just the beginning. The beginning of a 2 year graduate school journey. Or the beginning of waiting another year or shifting your goals. I don’t want to get cliché  here, rambling on about opening windows or when a door closes another opens. Blah blah…rejection letters just make you want to slam every door and break a window. But really, these letters don’t define your worth. You are worthy of your aspirations in this field.

Press on or move on – it’s up to you. But don’t let an acceptance letter boost your ego too much, and don’t let a rejection letter deflate all your dreams.

If you are waiting to hear back from various SLP graduate schools, then my thoughts are with you. Keep me posted and keep your spirits high!

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Which SLP university should I pick? – At least consider the debt


I’ve had a few moments lately where I started thinking about what I was thinking, and how I came to think that way. It has little to do with the school’s name on my diploma or how much it cost me. It has everything to do with the supervisors and professors who taught me there. Obviously the university hired the professors and paid them, then I in-turn gave them all my money. So thank you University of West Georgia. But really….a degree in Speech-Language Pathology is a 2 year mentor-ship, littered with independent studying and sleepless nights. Conveniently located on a campus where everyone else is just as mentor-dependent. 

The quality of a mentor does not directly correlate with the amount of debt you have to incur in order to achieve a degree in Speech-Language Pathology.

debt slp

Continue reading “Which SLP university should I pick? – At least consider the debt”

ASHA Convention Posters: Tips and Suggestions


Since learning I made it into the battle rounds of presenting at #asha12 , I’ve asked around for advice on how to create these mystical posters. It is quite difficult to find an example online, much less how to go about putting one together. Have no fear, I’ve done all the work for those of you still searching.

Here are a few tips and helpful links to help make an ASHA Convention Poster Presentation: Continue reading “ASHA Convention Posters: Tips and Suggestions”

Direct Hire vs. Staffing Company – My Crossroads


I am at a crossroads. 

In May 2012, I traveled 5,000 +  miles  from Atlanta, Georgia to Kenai, Alaska (details in a previous post).During my 12 day stay, I observed 3 different SLPs – 2 in schools and 1 in private practice. After this visit, I was hooked. Now I want to live and work in Alaska as an SLP. Here we go.

On a beach in the Kenai Peninsula

Since then, I’ve flipped-flopped between waiting to work in Alaska until I finish my CF or actually doing my CF in Alaska. At the moment, I want to complete my CF in Alaska; so I’ve been looking into positions and exploring my options as both a direct hire or via staffing companies. Below is my experience with both school districts and staffing companies so far.

Continue reading “Direct Hire vs. Staffing Company – My Crossroads”

SLP Graduate School Midterm


In undergrad, studying for a midterm in a course like Biology, math, history, etc. was more about the short-term. How little can I study in order to make an A or B? or What do I need to make in order to make my desired grade? I’m sure others may disagree with this mentality, but that’s how I got things done. Now,  in SLP graduate school, I need to know this information for the long-term. I realize I will have these textbooks/resources down the road, but when I am assessing or treating a client, there are just certain things I need to know immediately. Thus, I study differently.

I have a midterm in Neuropathologies of Language on Tuesday covering the following topics from our Brookshire (2007), An Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders, textbook:

  1. Neuroanatomy
  2. Neurologic Assessment
  3. Assessment of Cognition
  4. Assessment of Language
  5. Context for Intervention
  6. Aphasia
  7. Right Hemisphere Syndrome

Continue reading “SLP Graduate School Midterm”

First year of SLP Graduate School (It needs its own name)


I just finished my first year of a Speech-Language Pathology Master’s Program here in Georgia. I have cried, sweat, laughed, and earned every ounce of that first year; it feels like there should a name instead of a sentiment like, “Congrats! You made it half way, now for the even harder part.” I have been trying to term the first year of SLP grad school; so here were some of my ideas:

  • Hell (sarcasm, of course)
  • SLP_Jumanji Journey
  • Newbie Years_SLP
  • The year you think you have every disorder you read about (needs work)

Continue reading “First year of SLP Graduate School (It needs its own name)”

SLP Hipster Salad


Are you aware that you have a mammillary body, infundibular stalk, peduncles, and an inferior olive in your brain? Well, you do; but it sounds more like hipster salad ingredients to me. If this comes up on my Neuropathologies quiz tomorrow, I plan to put “hipster salad” on the label; I will get extra points for my quip, I imagine.

 

“Tough times never last, but tough people do.” ~ Robert H. Schuller